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In the fifth blog post of this series, Brian Kerr and Ian Spence an experience report of a team learning and applying the Practice Mapping game. The power of this game is to see inside the mind of others and have useful discussions about the results.

In the fifth blog post of this series, Brian Kerr and Ian Spence an experience report of a team learning and applying the Practice Mapping game. The power of this game is to see inside the mind of others and have useful discussions about the results.

5 Tenets of Fostering Sustainable Change

Change. This simple word has been used to create communities, build businesses, and promote adoption within a myriad of other actionable objectives. It is as common as the air we breathe and as revolutionary as any invention. Yet in all of its grandeur, it has incessantly stumped many businesses and individuals along the way. Software has taken a front seat in several organizations. It has become the core to any business, and change initiatives have sprouted and evolved to provide better solutions, be they faster, smarter or more affordable. Furthermore, for those organizations that adapt to change well and continue to sustain said changes and evolve over time, the rewards are exponential and in many cases, lasting. As new companies emerge in markets offering innovative solutions that can ultimately disrupt the market, those organization that cannot and or will not adapt and change, and perhaps more importantly, sustain change will lose. As a result, software development teams are adopting agile development techniques to shorten development times, decrease risk, all whilst developing solutions to become more responsive to the needs of the business.

Since their inception some 30 years ago, use cases have been used to identify, organize, synthesize and clarify system requirements for organizations across the globe. In most recent years, they have been used in techniques such as user stories. Use-Case 2.0 is the new generation of use-case driven development – light, agile and lean – inspired by user stories, Scrum and Kanban. Although they are much more agile and lean, they still embody the same popular values from the past while expanding to architecture, design, test, user experience, and also instrumental in business modeling and software reuse. But, for the adoption of use cases to be seamless, there should be a balance of principles applied.

IJI has recently had the pleasure of working with Jeff Sutherland on a set of Essence cards that faithfully represent the Scrum Guide. As well as acting as a handy physical, and online glossary, the cards can be used to play games and help us all get better Scrum. In this new blog series, Brian Kerr and Ian Spence present a selection of the games you can play using the Scrum practice cards and, in some cases, other cards from Essence itself or from other complementary practices.

Read one of our student’s testimonial regarding our upcoming course, Better Scrum through Essence.

Picture of the box cover of a pack of Scrum Essentials Essence based cards.  Co-designed by Ivar Jacobson International and Scrum Inc.

IJI has recently had the pleasure of working with Jeff Sutherland on a set of Essence cards that faithfully represent the Scrum Guide. As well as acting as a handy physical, and online glossary, the cards can be used to play games and help us all get better Scrum. In this new blog series, Brian Kerr and Ian Spence present a selection of the games you can play using the Scrum practice cards and, in some cases, other cards from Essence itself or from other complementary practices.

In this blog article, the authors share the first game that can be played using the Scrum Essential Cards. Use Practice Patience as a great way to perform a holistic retrospective on your Scrum adoption.

In this blog article, the authors share the first game that can be played using the Scrum Essential Cards. Use Practice Patience as a great way to perform a holistic retrospective on your Scrum adoption.

In part three of this blog series, Brian and Ian review how a team played the Practice Patience game. They had been a Scrum team for over 6 months and were used to holding more traditional open ‘brainstorming’ style of retrospectives. The article reviews their experience with the cards guiding them to improve their application of Scrum, including some quotes from their Scrum Master.

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