Back to top

Articles

An ACM Queue Publication

The way we develop software struggles to keep pace with changes in technology and business. Even with the rise of agile, people still flip-flop from one branded method to another, throwing away the good with the bad and behaving more like religious cultists than like scientists.

This article explains why we need to break out of this repetitive dysfunctional behavior, and it introduces Essence, a new way of thinking that promises to free the practices from their method prisons and thus enable true learning organizations.

Is there a single method for the Internet of things?

The Industrial Internet Consortium predicts the IoT (Internet of Things) will become the third technological revolution after the Industrial Revolution and the Internet Revolution. Its impact across all industries and businesses can hardly be imagined. Existing software (business, telecom, aerospace, defense, etc.) is expected to be modified or redesigned, and a huge amount of new software, solving new problems, will have to be developed. As a consequence, the software industry should welcome new and better methods.

This article makes the case that to be a major player in this space you will need a multitude of methods, not just a single one. Existing popular approaches such as Scrum and SAFe (Scaled Agile Framework) may be part of the future, but you will also need many new methods and practices—some of which aren’t even known today. Extending a single method to incorporate all that is needed would result in something that is way too big and unwieldy. Instead, the new OMG (Object Management Group) standard Essence can be used to describe modular practices that can be composed together to form a multitude of methods, not only to provide for all of today’s needs, but also to be prepared for whatever the future may bring.

Essence is instrumental in moving software development toward a true engineering discipline

Industrial-­scale agile requires much more than just being able to scale agile. It also means taking a disciplined approach to ensuring that our IT investments are resulting in sustainable benefits for both the producing organization and its customers. This involves adopting a different approach to many aspects of agility. We need to look beyond small-­scale agile, beyond independent competitive islands of agile excellence, beyond individual craftsmanship and heroic teams, and beyond the short-­term, instant gratification that seems to be the focus of many well-­intentioned but self-­centered agile teams. It is this adoption of a more holistic approach that we call moving from craft to engineering.

This paper is published at acm.org.

Ending Method Wars: The Successful Utilization of Essence at Munich Re

"Could you please describe how an endeavor in application development progresses over time in a healthy way?" In 2010 Munich Re's application development department was asked this question. But as simple as the question may sound, it is as hard to answer. Even more so in a group of people with different views and experiences. One of the big challenges is the lack of a common language to allow the group to discuss, share and compare their ways of working. ESSENCE, an OMG standard finalized in June 2014, provides definitions and tools to overcome this challenge: it enables efficient discussions about a way of working, the identification of the essential elements that teams should share, the sharing of practices and processes, and the unambiguous documentation of defined ways of working. In this manner ESSENCE was successfully utilized at Munich Re to define a common way of working for all endeavors.

Use Cases are the Hub of the Software Development Lifecycle

Use cases have been around for almost 30 years as a requirements approach and have been part of the inspiration for more recent techniques such as user stories. Now the inspiration has flown in the other direction. Use-Case 2.0 is the new generation of use-case driven development - light, agile and lean - inspired by user stories, Scrum and Kanban.

Becoming better, faster, cheaper, and happier

In today's ever more competitive world, boards of directors and executives demand that CIOs and their teams deliver "more with less." Studies show, without any real surprise, that there is no one-size-fits-all method to suit all software initiatives. The SEMAT movement has an answer.

On Common Ground with Essence

Indian Statistical Institute in Kolkata hosted an inauguration of SEMAT India Chapter on June 4, 2014. The inauguration included two events: (1) a SEMAT Executive Committee meeting and (2) Tutorial on "Essence - A Foundation for Software Development Games" by Dr. Mira Kajko-Mattson and Dr. Ivar Jacobson. This interview was conducted during Dr. Jacobson's visit.

A thinking framework in the form of an actionable kernel.

This article presents a thinking framework in the form of an actionable kernel, which could benefit any team wishing to balance their risks and improve their way of working.

Combining agile and SEMAT yields more advantages than either one alone.

Combining agile and SEMAT yields more advantages than either one alone.

This paper discusses how two current popular movements complement one another to provide a powerful basis for software development.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Articles