Scaled Agile Framework

EM360 Interviews Ian Spence

In EM360’s Podcast interview, Ian speaks about his experiences of specialising in large-scale agile adoptions. Drawing on his expert knowledge, Ian has worked with hundreds of projects to introduce iterative and agile practices in sectors as diverse as government, telecommunications, finance, and internet start-ups.

Scaled Agile Announcement: January 30, 2018

Scaled Agile, Inc. today announced the induction of Ian Spence as a new Fellow into the SAFe Fellow program. The SAFe Fellow achievement is Scaled Agile’s most prestigious distinction, recognizing individuals who have exhibited the highest levels of thought leadership and transformational expertise for implementing the Scaled Agile Framework® (SAFe).

Ian met the SAFe Fellow requirements based on his ongoing contribution to the evolution of the Framework, his demonstrated success in implementing SAFe implementations in a broad range of industries and disciplines, and his willingness to share his expertise publicly through writing and speaking.

Part 4: Some practical tips to avoid waterfalling features

Many teams struggle to let go of their waterfall, silo mentality when they first transition to agile ways-of-working. In particular they shy away from collaboratively working on the definition, evolution and implementation of their backlog items insisting on up-front definition of Features and Stories, and clean handovers between the Product Owners and the Development Teams.

This is an issue that we see with all the various agile methods but which always seems to get compounded whenever teams try to scale. So what are the worst things you can do to compromise the agility of your program when using Features? In Part 4 of this series, Ian Spence provides some practical tips to avoid waterfalling your features.

Part 3: What Does it Mean for a Feature to be Ready?

Many teams struggle to let go of their waterfall, silo mentality when they first transition to agile ways-of-working. In particular they shy away from collaboratively working on the definition, evolution and implementation of their backlog items insisting on up-front definition of Features and Stories, and clean handovers between the Product Owners and the Development Teams.

This is an issue that we see with all the various agile methods but which always seems to get compounded whenever teams try to scale. So what are the worst things you can do to compromise the agility of your program when using Features? In Part 3 of this series, Ian Spence provides guidance on what it means for a Feature to be Ready.

7+Sins-Feature Preparation

Part 2: The Seven Deadly Sins of Feature Preparation

Many teams struggle to let go of their waterfall, silo mentality when they first transition to agile ways-of-working. In particular they shy away from collaboratively working on the definition, evolution and implementation of their backlog items insisting on up-front definition of Features and Stories, and clean handovers between the Product Owners and the Development Teams.

This is an issue that we see with all the various agile methods but which always seems to get compounded whenever teams try to scale. So what are the worst things you can do to compromise the agility of your program when using Features? In Part 2 of this series, Ian Spence defines the seven deadly sins of feature preparation, and the most wasteful practices we have seen teams adopt in an attempt to be better prepared for the PI Planning event.

Easy to Use Cards

The SAFe® principles are very powerful but our coaching and consulting experiences have shown that, as currently presented, they are far less accessible and intuitive than the Agile Manifesto and its supporting 12 Agile Principles. In line with the release of 4.5 of SAFe®, which simplifies and enhances the SAFe® big picture, we have produced a set of cards that we believe do the same for the underlying SAFe® Principles. The cards present the nine principles in a self-contained, readily accessible fashion — allowing executives, leaders, and team members to readily understand the principles and quickly assess their relevance. Download the cards today to help your teams be SAFe®.

This blog post introduces the SAFe Principle Cards produced by Ian Spence (SPCT) with help from Brian Kerr (SPC) and Brian Tucker (SPCT).

The Critical Roles Executives, Product Managers and Release Train Engineers play in Enterprise scale agile software development.

In May 2017, agile leaders from the banking, insurance, telecom, technology and publishing sectors gathered with Ivar Jacobson International (IJI) at the Tower of London to discuss the important role executives, product managers and release trains engineers play in a successful agile transformation programme. With clients from Deutsche Bank, SimCorp and Mastercard participating in the panel discussions, guests heard first-hand what it really means to adopt, resource and carry out these roles in large, often quite traditional, internal software development organisations.

Preparing Features for PI Planning: SAFe

Part 1: The Danger of Waterfall Thinking: Just Enough, Just In Time Is Actually Very Little

Many teams struggle to let go of their waterfall, silo mentality when they first transition to agile ways-of-working. In particular they shy away from collaboratively working on the definition, evolution and implementation of their backlog items insisting on up-front definition of Features and Stories, and clean handovers between the Product Owners and the Development Teams.

This is an issue that we see with all the various agile methods but which always seems to get compounded whenever teams try to scale. In this short blog series we will look at how this tendency towards waterfall thinking can seriously hinder team’s adopting SAFe® and working with a Program Backlog full of Features. We will also provide some advice on how to get your Features Ready without succumbing to premature Story writing.

Better Predictability of Delivery and Closer Connectivity to the Customer

  • Better quality and better predictability of delivery
  • The entire product division talking the same language using the same concepts
  • More responsive delivery with the ability to demo features to clients as the teams are developing them

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