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Agile Development

Image of the Scrum Practice Sprint Review card. Pulled from the Scrum Essentials Practice developed in conjunction with Scrum Inc.

Scrum and its hybrids are the dominant approaches used by Agile teams today. However, despite Scrum being a seemingly simple framework, many teams struggle to apply Scrum well and fail to achieve the faster delivery of higher value products that are promised.

Image of part of a concept map used by IJI consultants to explain Lean Portfolio Management (LPM) principles in this instance structuring portfolio events.

In this series of posts we wil explore the Events that either perform, schedule or track the activities that affect the Lifecycle of an Epic. This second post looks at how the events that run the Portfolio could be structured.

Image of part of a concept map used by IJI consultants to explain Lean Portfolio Management (LPM) principles in this instance Portfolio Events - exploring the decisions being made.

In this series of posts we wil explore the Events that either perform, schedule or track the activities that affect the Lifecycle of an Epic. This first post looks at the activites that the Portfolio needs to perform in order for it to make progress.

Image depicting Lean Portfolio Management LPM portfolio kanban board or canvas.  Part of the LPM series, this article specifically covers On The Nature Of Portfolios - Portfolio Kanban - Alternative Scenarios

Epics have a lifecycle, they don’t magically appear fully formed. There is work to be done to progressively elaborate a business case and if the Epic is approved then there is further work to progress the Epic through implementation. This post looks at some of the alternate scenarios that might be seen in the Epic lifecycle, covering Bad Ideas, Small Ideas, Lean-Startup and Exploring Options.

Image depicting Lean Portfolio Management LPM portfolio kanban board or canvas.  Part of the LPM series, this article specifically covers On The Nature Of Portfolios - Portfolio Kanban - Normal Scenarios

Epics have a lifecycle, they don’t magically appear fully formed. There is work to be done to progressively elaborate a business case and if the Epic is approved then there is further work to progress the Epic through implementation. In this post we’ll explore the Portfolio Kanban that visualises the lifecycle of an Epic and look at some of the decisions that influence the Epic’s progress through its lifecycle.  

scaled agile portfolio epic lifecycle and epic states

Epics have a lifecycle, they don’t magically appear fully formed. There is work to be done to progressively elaborate a business case and if the Epic is approved then there is further work to progress the Epic through implementation. This post explores the Lifecycle of an Epic and the states it progresses through in that Lifecycle.

Development Staff Playing Scrum Games

This article explores the synergy of Scrum and Essence, a domain model of software engineering processes, intending to become a common ground for software development methods, bringing clarity into the composition of methods from individual practices.

Essence Agility Training Cards and States Image

What do we mean by Quality? The word Quality is commonly used in software development, but it isn’t always clear what is meant by it. Teams create Definitions of Done, configure thresholds in their CI/CD pipeline, write performance tests and agree service level agreements, but are these sufficient for the level of Quality the customer expects?

SAFe Participatory Budgeting Image - agile development budget management

This post is an exploration of whether you should be estimating Expense or Effort. Both are required from different processes within the Scaled Agile Framework and there is a route to convert between the two, but which should be the principal estimate and which the derivation?

Essence Coaching Card Game - Chase the State

The purpose of governance is to provide confidence that expensive development projects are progressing at a satisfactory pace and will deliver the required outcomes at the required quality. They are often applied at a ‘whole organization’ level, with all teams required to report into them in the same way. They have often evolved from traditional, linear project management processes, often with checkpoints, gateways, milestones and compliance documents. Which is fine if we believe that the solutions being delivered are relatively stable and unlikely to change. However, what if that’s not the case? How do they cope if the problem space evolves, the criteria for success are unclear or the stakeholders change their minds?

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